Guest Lecture Series on Buddhism

By Lay Scholars & Practitioners from around the World


Namo tassa bhagavato arahato samma sambuddhassa x 3


(Honor to him the blessed one the worthy one the fully enlightened one. My utmost respect to the perfectly enlightened samma sambuddha, the noble doctrine of the buddha and the noble maha sangha the disciples of the buddha!)


Hello dear dhamma friends, welcome to the lecture two of our Guest Lecture series. Under this weekly Guest Lecture series we will cover up more current and modern topics related to Buddhism to help benefit our community around the world. I certainly believe this effort by Dhamma USA is going to help the community to apply Buddhist teachings in a more practical level. 


Please mark your calendar every Thursday at 6:00 am pacific time, to get more benefited from this Guest Lecture series. Kindly check with Dhamma USA YouTube Channel & Facebook page & Facebook Groups for more updates. 


Every Thursday Live at :

  • 6:00 PM PST (Thursday) (USA Time 🇺🇸 | PST | GMT-8)
  • 9:00 PM EST (Thursday) (USA Time 🇺🇸 | EST | GMT-8)
  • 6:30 AM IST for India & Sri Lanka (Friday) (SL & India Time 🇱🇰 🇮🇳 | IST | GMT+5.30)
  • 9:00 AM Malaysia/Singapore (Friday)
  • 8:00 AM Indonesia (Friday)

For more information about this Special Guest Lecture Series click here to take a look at our Dhamma USA official Website. 

Join us live through the following Dhamma USA Social Media Network: 

Email : info@dhammausa.com
Website: www.dhammausa.org

Dear Dhamma friends, please mark your calendar every Thursday at 6:00 pm pacific time to get more benefited. Kindly check with Dhamma USA YouTube Channel & Facebook page & Facebook Groups for more updates.

Here are the Dhamma Sharing sessions we have conducted so far: 

 Pali 101- PALI FOR BEGINNERS COURSES (Free ONLINE Courses)

(English Medium)
2022-3
Through Dhamma USA YouTube Channel 


  • These courses have been designed for beginner level students to help benefit the enthusiastic students around the world to learn the noble Pali language and eventually learn how to read the Pali Tipitaka all by themselves at the completion of the upcoming advanced courses.

  • 1. COURSE : PALI 101 - PALI FOR BEGINNERS
  • MEDIUM: ENGLISH
  • LEVEL: 1
  • DAY: FRIDAY (PACIFIC TIME) 
  • TIME: 9:30 PM (PST)
  • INSTRUCTOR: Bhante Sumitta
  • 2. COURSE : PALI 101 - PALI FOR BEGINNERS
  • MEDIUM: ENGLISH
  • LEVEL: 2
  • DAY: SATURDAY (PACIFIC TIME) 
  • TIME: 5:30 PM (PST)
  • INSTRUCTOR: Bhante Sumitta
    • 3. COURSE : PALI 101 - PALI FOR BEGINNERS
    • MEDIUM: ENGLISH
    • LEVEL: 3
    • DAY: SATURDAY (PACIFIC TIME) 
    • TIME: 4:00 PM (PST)
    • INSTRUCTOR: Bhante Sumitta

  • Click here to enroll for our classes.
  • Please subscribe to our Dhamma USA YouTube Channel to join this Pali Class. 
  • You can also email us at info@dhammausa.com.

 Special Dhamma Talk Series

By Popular Sangha Members around the World


Dear Dhamma friends, welcome to the Special Dhamma Talk series by some popular and erudite Buddhist Sangha around the world. Under this weekly Dhamma Talk series we will cover up some really important topics on Theravada Buddhism to help benefit our community around the world. We certainly believe this effort by Dhamma USA is going to open up more horizon of Dhamma knowledge among our community. We are so delighted to have Venerable Professor Moragollagama Uparatana Thero as our guest speakers and we are confident that these capable monks and nuns who have been amply trained with both the Dhamma knowledge and practice.

Join us every Sunday Live through Dhamma USA Social Media Network for this exciting and refreshing Dhamma Sharing Sessions by Buddhist Bhikkhus, Bhikkhunis and Sayalays around the world. Every Dhamma Sharing will be included with a Q&A session and you can ask any Dhamma related questions from these wonderful Sangha members. 

Every Sunday Live at :

  • 7:30 am (USA Time 🇺🇸 | PST | GMT-8)
  • 10:30 am (USA Time 🇺🇸 | EST | GMT-8)
  • 8:00 pm (SL & India Time 🇱🇰 🇮🇳 | IST | GMT+5.30)
For more information about this Special Dhamma Talk series click here to take a look at our Dhamma USA official Website. 

Week 20 | How to Trigger Right View (Sammā Diṭṭhi)? | Bhante Sumitta (Sri Lanka)

Bhante Sumitta is a traditionally trained Buddhist Monk from Sri Lanka and vastly experienced in the subject for over 40 years and has a lot of exposure in the fields of Dhamma Talks, Meditation Programs, Pali Chanting, Pali language teaching, Spiritual Care and Social Welfare activities in and out of USA. Bhante Sumitta is currently the Founder of Dhamma USA, a California based Spiritual Care & Community Care services. For more information please visit www.dhammausa.org and other social media networks.

Week 19 | Meditation Teachings based on Ledi Sayadaw's Teachings | Rev. U. Siddhatthalankara (Sri Lanka) 

Rev. U. Siddhattha (Siddhatthālankāra) is a Sri Lankan monk ordained as a novice on May 22nd 2004, at Siri Sugata Senasuna, Kurunegala, one of the main branches of the Arankele Forest Monastery, belonging to Shwegyin Nikāya. The main centre is well known as Kanduboda Siyane International Meditation Center. He received his first higher ordination in May 2005 in Shwegyin Nikāya.

While staying in Shwegyin Nikāya, he passed the second level of the Prācīna (Paṇḍita) exam and practised Vipassanā meditation on the Mahāsi method in several meditation centres. 

After four years, he went to Na Uyana Forest Monastery and received the second higher ordination on June 18th 2008, in Galdūwa Gunawardhana Yogāśramaya, Ramañña Nikāya. During the first four years, he dwelled at Nā Uyana Forest Monastery, under the guidance of Most Venerable Nā Uyne Ariyadhamma Mahā Thera, Most Venerable Mīgoda Saṅghasobhana Mahā Thera and Most Venerable Angulgamuwe Ariyananda Mahā Thera. He practised Samatha and Vipassanā meditation at Nā Uyana Forest Monastery, Sri Lanka. In the fifth year, he studied Vinaya at Diddeṇiya Forest Monastery under the guidance of Nuwaraeliye Ñāṇasīla Mahā Thera. 


For further studies, he came to Myanmar: on February 20th 2013. He learned Vinaya, Sutta and Abhidhamma and Pāli grammar in the following monasteries in Myanmar: Mahvihāra Monastery, Tipitaka Mahā Gandhāyum Monastery and Yatana Pangon Monastery. While studying in Myanmar, he passed the “Sāsanālaṅkāra” (Samaṇejo) exam as the first Sri Lankan monk in 2018 in Myanmar. Moreover, he passed the “Vinaya Vidū” Exam as the first Sri Lankan monk in 2018 in Myanmar. At the same time, he graduated Bachelor of Art in Buddha Dhamma at International Theravada Buddhist Missionary University in 2020. He also practised Samatha and Vipassanā meditation at several Pa Auk meditation centres in Myanmar and Vipassanā meditation at Panḍitārāma (Mahāsi method).


He is currently learning for a Master’s degree in Buddhist Philological Pathway at Shan State Buddhist University. In addition, he is a current secretary and head of the Vinaya department at the International Institute of Theravada.

Week 18 | Radiating Loving Kindness | Practice of Mettā in Difficult Times | Ayya Anandabodhi (England)

Herein through the week number 18 of our weekly special Dhamma Talk series, Ayya Anandabodhi, the co-founder of Aloka Vihara Forest Monastery in California discuss about the Radiating Loving Kindness during the difficult times. 

Ayya Anandabodhi first encountered the Buddha’s teaching in her early teens. Igniting deep confidence in the Buddha’s teachings. At the age of 24, she entered monastic training at Amaravati Buddhist Monastery in England. In 2009 she moved to the USA to help create more opportunities for women to live Buddhist monastic life. In 2011 she took full Bhikkhuni Ordination, joining the worldwide revival of the Theravada Bhikkhuni Order. Ayya Anandabodhi is co-founder of Aloka Vihara Forest Monastery in California. Her practice and teaching are guided by early Buddhist scriptures, living in community, and through nature’s pure and immediate Dhamma.

Week 17 | Art of Mindful Living | Venerable Panna Theri (Myanmar)

Ven. Panna Theri is a Theravāda Buddhist nun and a Myanmar citizen. She has completed an M.A degree in Buddhist Studies, Postgraduate Institute of Pali and Buddhist Studies, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka in 2018. She received the ‘Gold Medal Award 2017’ in the M.A program. Currently, she is a Ph.D. Candidate at Shan State Buddhist University (SSBU), Myanmar, and undertaking her Ph.D. Thesis on Grief (Soka) Management and Buddhist Psychology. She is also lecturing Theravāda Buddhist Meditation: Theory and Practice and Study Skills (Academic way of learning Buddhism) modules at the Postgraduate Diploma and M.A programs at Shan State Buddhist University. Her primary interest is the integration of Theravāda Buddhist psychological teachings into contemporary Western psychotherapies. With regard to meditation practices, she is familiar with the Satipaṭṭhāna, Samatha, and Vipassanā meditation practices in different traditions in Myanmar (e.g. Mahāsī, Pa-Auk, Shwe Oo Min, Paḍitārāma traditions, Mogok, S.N Goenka, etc.). Recently, she has established her own center called Bodhi Therī Meditation Centre in Taunggyi, Myanmar, and is also undertaking online meditation retreats and Dhamma teachings. 

Week 15 | How to Maintain Inner Peace? | Bhante Sumitta (Sri Lanka)

Bhante Sumitta is a traditionally trained Buddhist Monk from Sri Lanka and vastly experienced in the subject for over 40 years and has a lot of exposure in the fields of Dhamma Talks, Meditation Programs, Pali Chanting, Pali language teaching, Spiritual Care and Social Welfare activities in and out of USA. Bhante Sumitta is currently the Founder of Dhamma USA, a California based Spiritual Care & Community Care services. For more information please visit www.dhammausa.org and other social media networks.

Week 14 | Five Precepts & Happy Home | Venerable Dr. Tikkhavaṃsālaṅkāra (Myanmar) |

Venerable Tikkhavaṃsālaṇkāra is Theravāda Buddhist monk, 17 vācā, and he completed an MA (Buddhist Studies) program from University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka in 2017. Before studying at Srilankā, in 2014, he got ‘Sāsanadhajadhammācariya’ degree in Myanmar and after that, he sat for Tipiṭaka exams and received ‘Vinayadhara’ degree in 2012 and ‘Ubhatovibhaṇgadhara’ degree in 2010 respectively. He passed Sāmane-kyaw exams and got ‘Alaṇkāra’ degree when he was 19 years old. Then, he completed an MA (Pāli and Buddhist studies) program from Shan State Buddhist University, Myanmar in 2021. Now he has been studying a Master of Philosophy program and delivering the Pāli lecture to the Post Graduate Diploma students at Shan State Buddhist University in Myanmar.

Week 13 | Human Condition & Its Value of Moral Life | Venerable Dr. Varanyana (Myanmar) |

Venerable Dr. Varanyana is a Theravada Buddhist monk, was born in 1984, in rural village of Rakhine state, western Myanmar. Venerable has been a monk since 12 years old. He was higher ordained at the age of 20. Since the age of 19, he taught basic Buddhist texts to young novices, and from 2010 to 2012, he became a lecturer of higher Buddhist texts of Dhamma Cariya degree to the monks. In 2014, he received his M.A degree in Buddhist Studies in 2014 from Postgraduate Institute of Pali & Buddhist Studies, University of Kelaniya. He was appointed as a visiting lecturer at PGIPBS, University of Kelaniya during the academic year of 2019. He completed his Ph.D. degree form the same University in 2020. The title of his research is ‘A Critical Study of Concept of Motivation in Buddhist Jātaka Story”. By 2021, he also extended his knowledge area in the field of Buddhist Psychology by joining another M.A course on “Master of Arts in Buddhist Āyuvedic Counseling”. Week 12 | The Art of Mindful Living (Part 1) | Venerable Paññā Theri (Myanmar) |

Ven. Panna Theri is a Theravāda Buddhist nun and a Myanmar citizen. She has completed an M.A degree in Buddhist Studies, Postgraduate Institute of Pali and Buddhist Studies, University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka in 2018. She received the ‘Gold Medal Award 2017’ in the M.A program. Currently, she is a Ph.D. Candidate at Shan State Buddhist University (SSBU), Myanmar, and undertaking her Ph.D. Thesis on Grief (Soka) Management and Buddhist Psychology. She is also lecturing Theravāda Buddhist Meditation: Theory and Practice and Study Skills (Academic way of learning Buddhism) modules at the Postgraduate Diploma and M.A programs at Shan State Buddhist University. Her primary interest is the integration of Theravāda Buddhist psychological teachings into contemporary Western psychotherapies. With regard to meditation practices, she is familiar with the Satipaṭṭhāna, Samatha, and Vipassanā meditation practices in different traditions in Myanmar (e.g. Mahāsī, Pa-Auk, Shwe Oo Min, Paḍitārāma traditions, Mogok, S.N Goenka, etc.). Recently, she has established her own center called Bodhi Therī Meditation Centre in Taunggyi, Myanmar, and is also undertaking online meditation retreats and Dhamma teachings.

Week 11| Building Psychological Immunity Through Buddhist Discourses | Venerable Dr. Varanyana (Myanmar)

Venerable Dr. Varanyana is a Theravada Buddhist monk, was born in 1984, in rural village of Rakhine state, western Myanmar. Venerable has been a monk since 12 years old. His higher was made in age of 20... Since at 19, he taught basic Buddhist texts to young novices, and from 2010 to 2012, he became a lecturer of higher Buddhist texts of Dhamma Cariya degree to the monks. In 2014, he received his M.A degree in Buddhist Studies in 2014 from Postgraduate Institute of Pali & Buddhist Studies, University of Kelaniya. He was appointed as a visiting lecturer at PGIPBS, University of Kelaniya during the academic year of 2019. He completed his Ph.D. degree form the same University in 2020. The title of his research is ‘A Critical Study of Concept of Motivation in Buddhist Jātaka Story”. By 2021, he also extended his knowledge area in the field of Buddhist Psychology by joining another M.A course on “Master of Arts in Buddhist Āyuvedic Counseling”. Week 10 | Significance of Jaya Maṅgala Gāthā | Venerable Professor Moragollagama Uparatana Thero (Sri Lanka) |

Venerable Professor Moragollagama Uparathana Thero, the Dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies in Buddhist and Pali University of Sri Lanka is a renowned scholar in Pali Language in Sri Lanka with three Master's Degrees, an M.Phil. and a Ph.D. degree. He graduated in 2001 from the University of Kelaniya. He has earned Master’s degrees in Buddhist Studies from the Postgraduate Institute of Pali and Buddhist Studies at the University of Kelaniya in 2002 and 2003, the University of Hong Kong in 2003-2004, the University of Kelaniya in 2009 and Wuhan University of China in 2011 respectively. He was fortunate enough to be awarded the Glorious Sun Group Scholarship offered by the University of Hong Kong. He was offered a scholarship from the Government of China through the Ministry of Higher Education, Sri Lanka to complete his Ph.D. at the University of Wuhan, China. He has sound knowledge of English and Chinese languages as well as classical languages such as Pali and Sanskrit. He is competent in carrying out research and he distinguished himself by presenting exceptionally well-researched articles and papers at many national and international conferences.

For more about Venerable Professor Uparatana please visit this link.

Week 9 | Broadening & Narrowing Mental States | Venerable Palmadulle Vijitanandabhivamsa (Sri Lanka) |

Week 8 | Diligence in Buddhism | Venerable Professor Gallelle Sumanasiri (Sri Lanka) |

Senior Professor Venerable Dr. Gallelle Sumanasiri Thero is a Former Vice-Chancellor of The Buddhist and Pali University of Sri Lanka.  For more info about Venerable Professor Sumanasiri, please visit this link.

Week 7 | Buddhist Teachings for a Flourishing Life | Venerable Palmadulle Vijitanandabhivamsa (Sri Lanka) | Week 6 | Buddhists for You | Venerable Dr. Mirisse Dhammika Thero (Sri Lanka) | Week 5 | Mettā (Loving Kindness) | Venerable Palmadulle Vijitanandabhivamsa (Sri Lanka) | Week 4 | How Cycle of Rebirth Happens & How to Get out of It? | Venerable Maggavihari (Sri Lanka) | Week 3 | What Are Four Refuges? | by Venerable Maggavihari (Sri Lanka) |

This Special Dhamma Talk series by Venerable Maggavihari will be very useful to our Dhamma friends. Mark your calendar not to miss this great opportunity to learn the Buddha Dhamma from a very well trained Sri Lankan Buddhist monk. Join us through Dhamma USA and IIT YouTube channels and Facebook pages. Here he discusses about the noble Eightfold Path - ariya aṭṭhaṅgika magga.

Week 2 | What is Noble Eightfold Path? | by Venerable Watagoda Maggavihari (Sri Lanka) |

This Special Dhamma Talk series by Venerable Maggavihari will be very useful to our Dhamma friends. Mark your calendar not to miss this great opportunity to learn the Buddha Dhamma from a very well trained Sri Lankan Buddhist monk. Join us through Dhamma USA and IIT YouTube channels and Facebook pages. Here he discusses about the noble Eightfold Path - ariya aṭṭhaṅgika magga.

Week 1 | 4 Iddhipada | Venerable Maggavihari (Sri Lanka) |

This Special Dhamma Talk series by Venerable Maggavihari will be very useful to our Dhamma friends. Mark your calendar not to miss this great opportunity to learn the Buddha Dhamma from a very well trained Sri Lankan Buddhist monk. Join us through Dhamma USA and IIT YouTube channels and Facebook pages. Here he discusses about the noble Eightfold Path - ariya aṭṭhaṅgika magga.

Week 2 | Venerable Watagoda Maggavihari | Vice President of International Institute of Theravada


This Special Dhamma Talk series by Venerable Maggavihari will be very useful to our Dhamma friends. Mark your calendar not to miss this great opportunity to learn the Buddha Dhamma from a very well trained Sri Lankan Buddhist monk. Join us through Dhamma USA and IIT YouTube channels and Facebook pages. Here he discusses about the noble Eightfold Path - ariya aṭṭhaṅgika magga.

Join us live through the following Dhamma USA Social Media Network: 

Email : info@dhammausa.com
Website: www.dhammausa.org

Dear Dhamma friends, please mark your calendar every Sunday at 7.30 am pacific time, 10.30 am eastern time and 8 pm SL/IST to get more benefited. Kindly check with Dhamma USA YouTube Channel & Facebook page & Facebook Groups for more updates.

Here are the Dhamma Sharing sessions we have conducted so far: 

MED101 | Yoga & Meditation for Beginners  

Hello friends, we are organizing a Yoga & Meditation class for beginners from March 13, 2022.




This free course is conducted through Dhamma USA Zoom channel and it's completely free.

Starting on March 13, 2022

Every Sunday at

  • 6 am Pacific Time (PST)
  • 8 am Central Time (CT)
  • 9 am Eastern Time (EST)
  • 6:30 pm Indian Standard Time (IST) (same time with Indian & Sri Lanka)
What you need to prepare: 

  • Yoga Mat exercises and meditation
  • Comfortable dress for stretching 
Please sign up as the seats can be limited for this Free Online Course. 

This Yoga & Meditation class will help you to maintain a balanced and healthy body and mind. 

Please click 👉 here 👈 to sign up. 

#yoga #meditation #buddhism #dhammausa

 Dasa Saṃyojana - Ten Fetters - Part 1


Sotāpannassāti sotāpattiphalaṃ pattassa. Sakkāyadiṭṭhiyāti vīsativatthukāya sakkāyadiṭṭhiyāVicikicchāyāti aṭṭhasu ṭhānesu kaṅkhāya. Sīlabbataparāmāsāti ‘‘sīlena suddhi, vatena suddhī’’ti parāmasitvā uppajjanakadiṭṭhi. Diṭṭhānusayāti appahīnaṭṭhena santāne anusayakā diṭṭhānusayā. Tathā vicikicchānusayā. Tadekaṭṭhehi cāti tehi sakkāyadiṭṭhiādīhi ekato ṭhitehi ca. Upatāpenti vibādhenti cāti kilesā, tehi sakkāyadiṭṭhiyādikilesehi cittaṃ vivittaṃ suññaṃ hoti. Ettha ‘‘tadekaṭṭha’’nti duvidhaṃ ekaṭṭhaṃ pahānekaṭṭhaṃ sahajekaṭṭhañca. Apāyagamanīyā hi kilesā yāva sotāpattimaggena na pahīyanti, tāva diṭṭhivicikicchāhi saha ekasmiṃ puggale ṭhitāti pahānekaṭṭhā. Dasasu hi kilesesu idha diṭṭhivicikicchā eva āgatā. Anusayesu diṭṭhānusayavicikicchānusayā āgatā. Sesā pana apāyagamanīyo lobho doso moho māno thinaṃ uddhaccaṃ ahirikaṃ anottappanti aṭṭha kilesā diṭṭhivicikicchāhi saha pahānekaṭṭhā hutvā dvīhi anusayehi saddhiṃ sotāpattimaggena pahīyanti. Rāgadosamohapamukhesu vā diyaḍḍhesu kilesasahassesu sotāpattimaggena diṭṭhiyā pahīyamānāya diṭṭhiyā saha vicikicchā pahīnā, diṭṭhānusayavicikicchānusayehi saha apāyagamanīyā sabbakilesā pahānekaṭṭhavasena pahīyanti. Sahajekaṭṭhā pana diṭṭhiyā saha vicikicchāya ca saha ekekasmiṃ citte ṭhitā avasesakilesā.

sutta>khuddaka>Mahāniddesa>《Mahāniddesa-aṭṭhakathā》>Mahāniddesa-aṭṭhakathā>2. Guhaṭṭhakasuttaniddesavaṇṇanā>para. 386

Sotāpanna 

Sotāpanna: the 'Stream-winner' or 'stream-entrant', is the lowest of the 8 Noble Disciples see: ariya-puggala Three kinds are to be distinguished: the one 'with 7 rebirths at the utmost' sattakkhattu-parama, the one 'passing from one noble family to another' kolankola the one 'germinating only once more' eka-bījī 
As it is said e.g. Pug. 37-39; A. III, 87:
  1. If a man, after the disappearance of the 3 mental chains personality-belief, skeptical doubt, attachment to rules and ritual; see: samyojana has entered the stream to Nibbāna, he is no more subject to rebirth in lower worlds, is firmly established, destined to full enlightenment. After having passed amongst the divine and human beings only seven times more through the round of rebirths, he puts an end to suffering. Such a man is called 'one with 7 births at the utmost' sattakkhattu-parama.
  2. If a man, after the disappearance of the 3 mental chains. is destined to full enlightenment, he, after having passed among noble families two or three times through the round of rebirths, puts an end to suffering. Such a man is called 'one passing from one noble family to another' kolaṅkola.
  3. If a man, after the disappearance of the 3 mental chains. is destined to full enlightenment, he, after having only once more returned to human existence, puts an end to suffering. Such a man is called 'one germinating only once more' eka-bījī See Sotāpatti-Saṃyutta S. LV.

Characteristics of a Sotapanna

  • The sotapanna has abandoned the first three of the lower fetters: personality view, doubt, misapprehension of precepts and vows. (Ratanasutta Sn. 233)
  • He is freed from the possibility of rebirth in the four lower realms. (Ratanasutta Sn. 234)
  • He is incapable of concealing any bodily, verbal or mental transgression. (Ratanasutta Sn. 235)
  • He has abandoned any lust, hate or delusion that would be strong enough to cause rebirth in the lower realms. (Abhabba Sutta AN. iii. 438)
He is incapable of 8 actions: 
(Bahudhātuka Sutta MN. 115)
    1. treating any saṅkhāra as permanent, 
    2. treating any saṅkhāra as pleasurable, 
    3. treating any dhamma as self, 
    4. killing his mother, 
    5. father or an arahant, 
    6. causing bleeding in a Tathagata with evil intent, 
    7. splitting the Sangha, or 
    8. going over to another teacher. 
    Paṭhama Abhabbaṭṭhāna Sutta AN. iii. 438-9):
    He is incapable of living without reverence for the Buddha, 
    • the Dhamma, 
    • the Sangha, and 
    • the training. 
    • Nor can he embrace any of the 62 wrong views or take an eighth birth. 
    Dutiya-Abhabbaṭṭhāna Sutta AN. iii. 439:
    • He is incapable of seeking outside the Sangha for persons worthy of gifts. 
    Catuttha-Abhabbaṭṭhāna Sutta AN. iii. 440:

    He cannot fall into the six wrong views that 
    • pleasure and pain are self-wrought, or 
    • wrought by another, or 
    • wrought by both oneself and another, or 
    • arise by chance without any act by self, or 
    • arise by chance without any act by another, or 
    • arise by chance without any act by either self or another. "For the one attained to right view sees well both causes and dhammas that are causally arisen." 
    Anisansa Sutta: Rewards AN. iii. 441):
    • He is fixed unshakably in the True Dhamma, 
    • is incapable of backsliding (to being a worlding), 
    • his future dukkha is finite, 
    • he has attained to knowledge not common to worldlings, 
    • cause and causally arisen dhammas are seen rightly by him.  
    He possesses unshakable confidence in the Three Jewels and the unbroken virtue that is pleasing to the noble ones. (numerous Suttas)

    The Ogadha Sutta (S 55.2); SD 3.3(4.1.4):
    The qualities of a streamwinner: The Ogadha Sutta (S 55.2) simply defines the “qualities of a stream-winner” (*sotāpanna,dhamma) as follows: 
    1. wise faith in the Buddha, buddhe aveccappasāda 
    2. wise faith in the Dharma, dhamme aveccappasādena 
    3. wise faith in the Sangha, and saṅghe aveccappasādena 
    4. moral virtue dear to the noble ones. ariya,kanta sīla 
    Here, the term “qualities of a stream-winner” is a general one, which is probably an old term, which is later replaced by the phrasal term, “the limbs of stream-winning” (sotāpannassa aṅga) in contrast to “the limbs for stream-winning” (sotāpatti-y-aṅga). However, as we will see below, their usages significantly overlap. 

    Qualities to be cultivated: (Sotāpatti-y-) Aṅga Sutta (S 55.50):
    Where the person involved is clearly a non-stream-winner, the qualities he should cultivate for his spiritual development are usually called “the limbs for stream-winning” (sotāpatti-y-aṅga). According to the (Sotāpatti-y-) Aṅga Sutta (S 55.50), these 4 limbs for stream-winning, “when cultivated, often developed, lead to the realization of the fruit of stream-winning,” comprise the following: 

    (1) Associating with true individuals. sappurisa,saṁseva 
    (2) Hearing the true teaching. saddhamma,savana 
    (3) Wise attention. yoniso,manasikāra 
    (4) Practice of the Dharma in accordance dhammânudhamma,paṭipatti with the Dharma. 

    (S 55.50/5:404), SD 70.1(1)
    In other words, these are 4 conditions that conduce to the attaining of stream-winning in someone who is not yet a stream-winner.


    Sakkāyadiṭṭhi

    PTS: M i 299 -  MN44 - Culavedalla Sutta: The Shorter Set of Questions-and-Answers 

    “Kathaṃ panāyye, sakkāyadiṭṭhi hotī”ti? “Idhāvuso visākha, assutavā puthujjano, ariyānaṃ adassāvī ariyadhammassa akovido ariyadhamme avinīto, sappurisānaṃ adassāvī sappurisadhammassa akovido sappurisadhamme avinīto, rūpaṃ attato samanupassati, rūpavantaṃ vā attānaṃ, attani vā rūpaṃ, rūpasmiṃ vā attānaṃ. Vedanaṃ…pe… saññaṃ… saṅkhāre… viññāṇaṃ attato samanupassati, viññāṇavantaṃ vā attānaṃ, attani vā viññāṇaṃ, viññāṇasmiṃ vā attānaṃ. Evaṃ kho ¶, āvuso visākha, sakkāyadiṭṭhi hotī”ti.
    “Kathaṃ panāyye, sakkāyadiṭṭhi na hotī”ti?

    "But, lady, how does self-identification come about?"
    "There is the case, friend Visakha, where an uninstructed, run-of-the-mill person — who has no regard for noble ones, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma; who has no regard for men of integrity, is not well-versed or disciplined in their Dhamma — assumes form (the body) to be the self, or the self as possessing form, or form as in the self, or the self as in form.
    "He assumes feeling to be the self...
    "He assumes perception to be the self...
    "He assumes (mental) fabrications to be the self...
    "He assumes consciousness to be the self, or the self as possessing consciousness, or consciousness as in the self, or the self as in consciousness. This is how self-identification comes about."


    “Idhāvuso visākha, sutavā ariyasāvako, ariyānaṃ dassāvī ariyadhammassa kovido ariyadhamme suvinīto, sappurisānaṃ dassāvī sappurisadhammassa kovido sappurisadhamme suvinīto, na rūpaṃ attato samanupassati, na rūpavantaṃ vā attānaṃ, na attani vā rūpaṃ, na rūpasmiṃ vā attānaṃ. Na vedanaṃ…pe… na saññaṃ… na saṅkhāre…pe… na viññāṇaṃ attato samanupassati, na viññāṇavantaṃ vā attānaṃ ¶, na attani vā viññāṇaṃ, na viññāṇasmiṃ vā attānaṃ. Evaṃ kho, āvuso visākha, sakkāyadiṭṭhi na hotī”ti.

    "But, lady, how does self-identification not come about?"
    "There is the case where a well-instructed disciple of the noble ones — who has regard for noble ones, is well-versed & disciplined in their Dhamma; who has regard for men of integrity, is well-versed & disciplined in their Dhamma — does not assume form to be the self, or the self as possessing form, or form as in the self, or the self as in form.
    "He does not assume feeling to be the self...
    "He does not assume perception to be the self...
    "He does not assume fabrications to be the self...
    "He does not assume consciousness to be the self, or the self as possessing consciousness, or consciousness as in the self, or the self as in consciousness. This is how self-identification does not come about."
    Vicikicchā:

    Kaṅkhī hotīti buddha, dhamma, saṅghaguṇesu ceva sikkhāya ca pubbante ca aparante ca pubbantāparante ca paṭiccasamuppāde cāti aṭṭhasu ṭhānesu kaṅkhāya samannāgato hoti. 

    1. Doubt in the virtues of the Buddha
    2. Doubt in the virtues of the Dhamma
    3. Doubt in the virtues of the Sangha
    4. Doubt in the morality
    5. Doubt in the previous birth
    6. Doubt in the future birth
    7. Doubt in both the previous and future births
    8. Doubt in the Dependent Origination

    Vigatā cikicchāti vicikicchā, sabhāvaṃ vā vicinanto etāya kicchati kilamatīti vicikicchā, sā saṃsayalakkhaṇā, saṃsappanarasā, anicchayapaccupaṭṭhānā, anekaṃsaggāhapaccupaṭṭhānā vā, ayonisomanasikārapadaṭṭhānā. Paṭipattiantarāyakarāti daṭṭhabbā.

    sutta>khuddaka>Mahāniddesa>《Mahāniddesa-aṭṭhakathā》>Mahāniddesa-aṭṭhakathā>1. Kāmasuttaniddesavaṇṇanā>para. 221



    Sīlabbataparāmāsa 

    Interesting Discussion on the subject in Sutta Central: 

    MN 24 (Ratha-vinita Sutta: Relay Chariots) 
    we know that purification of morality is not Nibbana itself and therefore should not be clung to. 
    Furthermore, AN 3.78
    Kukkuravatika Sutta (MN-57) is often cited to explain the 3rd fetter. The ox-duty ascetic and the dog-duty-ascetic vows and practices are used as examples. But how many people, not to mention reasonable Buddhists, would vow and practice such extreme behaviors? 

    How did Sarakani become a stream enterer despite having an alcohol drinking habit?



    Pañcakkhandha – Piya Tan:


    1. Form (rūpa) arises when we give it a name (nāma). A thing “exists” for us when we put our minds to it.62 In this sense, our world is mind-made. 
    2. Feeling (vedanā) arises when any of our sense-faculties attends to an external object by way of the triangle of experience. 
    3. Perception (saññā) arises with feeling, when we recognize the hedonistic tone of an object or react with liking towards a pleasurable object, or with dislike towards an unpleasant object, or with neutral feeling towards a neutral object. 
    4. Formations (saṅkhārā) arise when we colour our perceptions with greed, grasping at a desirable object, or with hate, rejecting an undesirable object, or ignoring a neutral object. 
    5. Consciousness (viññāṇa) is the stage for all these drama, it is “a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.” 
    In meditation, we go back to the true basics, and work to see life clearly and directly on its most fundamental level, as it were.

    More Readings: